More than Cents, They Steal Sense: A Curious Case of Woollen Wolves in “Till the day we fly free” | a poem review #InMyHumbleOpinion

The essence of this essay is an analysis of a poem by Phila Dyasi (2017). It serves as a creative response to the concept of False Prophets and its embodiments.  This poem serves as a tool to analyse the plight of Christian contemporaries at the hands of false religious persons and why the very principles of Christianity ensure that these criminals succeed. The poetry piece will be examined using a critical analysis approach.

 

Phila Dyasi – “Till the day we fly free”

 

Till the day we fly free

 

I’m reaching but never gripping,

It’s soul ripping how they’re preaching,

yet are never teaching.

 

I’ll never hide,

even when I die.

I’ll be immortalized

in some formaldehyde.

Where my soul, spirit and skin divide

I’ll be like a deity,

the higher me,

doing the Lord’s work,

hire me.

 

The humble apple-pie

can satisfy no appetite

here comes the hunger tide.

 

When wings carried Icarus

through cutting winds

we were pulled feathers

of wisdom’s birdy-body of ink

taking flight to Olympus planes

the son, seeks The Sun.

 

I’m grown now,

dealing with chronic stress,

and I believe less in a deity,

it seems like too far a stretch.

 

The stench from a faithless,

hopeless, homeless.

 

 

REVIEW

In the presentation, the speaker employs a structured aaa rhyme scheme in the first stanza. The tercet- symbolises the Christian Holy Trinity concept, to illustrate a methodical system that is synonymous with organised religions. The tone is unsympathetic to the gullible masses.

The first three lines in stanza one are told from the first-person perspective, holding an interpretation sermon delivered by a false prophet meant to help the church learn something spiritual with the teachings in the preaching. Instead, he delivers a ‘religious’ talk that is devoid of the teaching element as it does not empower, but lacks spiritual depth that resonates with the brethren. This idea of this sermon not being enough is further supplemented by line 1, showing a desire for spiritual understanding, and what religion can and cannot do for a believer, but is ill-equipped to do so by not substantiating theological resources. It always seems out of reach, ensuring congregational return and with that comes monetary offerings by the truckloads.

 

The speaker liberates himself from all forms of fear, by guillotining death. By claiming he will forever be physically whole, not subject to decomposition (ll. 4-7), he cannot be held hostage by soothsayers who will emphasise the mortal nature of man, to force persons to bow down before them, and give their tithes to ‘God’ through them, supposedly. He says that the chemical formaldehyde, which preserves the corpse and can cause its demise – so this introduced the double-edged sword argument, that without moderation all things have capacity to do good and evil, and religion is no exception. This could be advice that believers must be constructive in their opinion and not be blinded by the opium. In cases of blurred lines, false prophets appear as exploitative.  Through the usage of a personification and a simile, the speaker extends the immortality argument to the abstract realm of spiritualism, proposing that he will be divine quality posthumous, (ll. 8-12) which is the popular claim of the falsifiers of the gospels –they punt God’s work, however the puns “higher” and “hire” suggest that theirs is for monetary gain.

 

The Greek myth of ‘Icarus: The Fall’ has a moral teaching that is consistent with the theme of moderation, as “the son, seeks The Sun” (l. 21), where the sun is symbolic of the concept of God, the highest form of all.  Daedalus’ son disobeyed nature and instructions, as feathers are dually used to soar and for the archaic form of writing here, which “we were pulled feathers/of wisdom’s birdy-body of ink” could refer to the divine knowledge in the Holy Bible, and disobedience proves fatal for the falsifiers of the gospel as it did for Icarus, as he was stripped of his power.

 

The last stanza is amalgamated with stanza three because it offers a final warning that if prophets and pastors who claim to be Christians, continue to command congregants to not fall short of the contemporary gimmicks that prophets use, then Christians will lose hope, belief and trust in the word of God. The ordinary sheep of God’s flock, entrusted to the guidance of prophets and pastors, are being hunted by wolves in wool.

 

#nbs

Advertisements

Author: NuBlaccSoul

...writings & the other things

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s